Изумрудная жемчужная трава (Hemianthus sp. «Amano Pearl Grass»)

Hemianthus sp. “Amano Pearl Grass”

Height: 5 – 20 cm

Availability [?] :

  • occasionally available from other aquarists

Synonyms:

  • Hemianthus sp. ”Göttingen”

Trader names [?] :

  • Hemianthus micranthemoides var.

Misapplied names:

  • Hemianthus micranthemoides
  • Micranthemum micranthemoides

Habit, plant type:

Baby tears is one of two Hemianthus species that has been cultivated in aquaria for a long time, known under the name “Hemianthus micranthemoides”. Recently it came out that neither belongs to this species. The better-known of these two aquarium plants was identified in early 2011 by Cavan Allen (USA) as Hemianthus glomeratus. The species of the other plant, which is presented here as Hemianthus sp. “Amano Pearl Grass”, could not be identified yet. It differs from Hemianthus glomeratus in some characteristics, in its emersed as well as in its submersed form (see below) [1, 4].
True H. micranthemoides has probably never been cultivated in aquaria, and may be extinct in nature.

Takashi Amano uses this Hemianthus under the name “Pearl Grass” in his aquascapes. Neil Frank (USA), who got this plant in 1995 from T. Amano, thus calls it Hemianthus sp. “Amano Pearl Grass” [2]. Amongst aquarists in Germany it has become known as Hemianthus sp. “Goettingen” in the last years. Hans-Georg Kramer (2009) gave this fresh green plant the German name Smaragd-Perlenkraut, which translates to emerald baby tears [3].
Sometimes, this plant is erroneously sold as Hemianthus callitrichoides “Cuba” in trade. The reason for this might be the fact that the emersed forms of H. callitrichoides “Cuba” and this hitherto unidentified Hemianthus look very much the same, and might be confused with each other from time to time in aquatic plant nurseries. However, the difference becomes quite clear when the plants develop submersed shoots.

Commercially available “H. micranthemoides” (H. glomeratus) has its leaves mostly in whorls of three or four, as well in its emersed as in its submersed form. Its submersed leaves are generally stronger bowed down as those of H. sp. “Amano Pearl Grass”.

As a rule, the leaves of H. sp. “Amano Pearl Grass” are opposite (2 leaves per node). Its emersed leaves are a little darker and more rounded with a hairier margin than those of H. glomeratus under the same conditions. As mentioned above, emersed H. sp. “Amano Pearl Grass” looks confusingly similar to emersed Hemianthus callitrichoides “Cuba”. The submersed leaves are straighter than those of H. glomeratus, but have more or less the same shape.
Its growth habit resembles that of Hemianthus glomeratus, however, H. sp. “Amano Pearl Grass” has a stronger tendency to sprout horizontal or slanted upright shoots. Groups of this plant look a bit more irregular and less “orderly” than those of H. glomeratus [4].

This Hemianthus is comparable to Hemianthus glomeratus regarding aquarium cultivation and use in layouts, but seems to grow a little faster and to be more undemanding. However, if CO2 is insufficient its shoot tips tend to stop growing altogether, and grey lime deposits may form on the leaves (due to biogenic decalcification). It has also been reported to be susceptible to nitrate concentrations of over 10 mg/l [3]. Moderate light is sufficient, however, under more intensive light it develops a bushier growth habit and is easier to keep low. A flat carpet in the foreground is best realised with plants that were precultivated emersed. [5].

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Aquascaping: well-branched, bushy

Hemianthus glomeratus

Quirlblдttriges Perlenkraut

Hemianthus glomeratus

Quirlblдttriges Perlenkraut

    Grazile, frischgrьne Stдngelpflanze Kleinblдttrig Bildet dichte Bьsche

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Beschreibung

Hemianthus glomeratus ist eine grazile Stдngelpflanze, die aus Florida stammt. Sie ist im Aquarienhobby seit langem irrtьmlich als Hemianthus micranthemoides (auch Micranthemum micranthemoides) bekannt und in den USA vor nicht langer Zeit korrekt bestimmt worden.

Mit ihren kleinen, hellgrьnen, gebogenen Blдttern wirkt sie sehr hьbsch in einer dichten Gruppe. Bei hoher Beleuchtungsstдrke wдchst sie teilweise kriechend und kann dann als Vordergrundpflanze verwendet werden. Hemianthus glomeratus eignet sich jedoch besser als Busch im Aquarien-Mittelgrund oder im Hintergrund von Nano-Becken. Man kann sie bei starker Beleuchtung auf feuchtem Substrat auch in der Landform kultivieren, die Pflanze bildet dann eine dichte, sehr kleinblдttrige Matte.

Das Perlkraut, das im Aquarienhobby seit Jahrzehnten als Hemianthus micranthemoides oder auch Micranthemum micranthemoides bekannt ist, wurde Anfang 2011 von Cavan Allen (USA) als Hemianthus glomeratus identifiziert.

Der echte Hemianthus micranthemoides ist eine andere Art, die eventuell nie in Aquarienkultur war. Der letzte Herbarbeleg dieser Pflanze aus der Natur stammt aus dem Jahre 1941, sie gilt heute als verschollen und mцglicherweise ausgestorben. Hemianthus micranthemoides kam im Atlantikkьstengebiet der USA zwischen Virginia und New York in der Gezeitenzone von Flьssen vor.

Hemianthus glomeratus ist hingegen in Flor >(mehr lesen)

Das Perlkraut, das im Aquarienhobby seit Jahrzehnten als Hemianthus micranthemoides oder auch Micranthemum micranthemoides bekannt ist, wurde Anfang 2011 von Cavan Allen (USA) als Hemianthus glomeratus identifiziert.

Der echte Hemianthus micranthemoides ist eine andere Art, die eventuell nie in Aquarienkultur war. Der letzte Herbarbeleg dieser Pflanze aus der Natur stammt aus dem Jahre 1941, sie gilt heute als verschollen und mцglicherweise ausgestorben. Hemianthus micranthemoides kam im Atlantikkьstengebiet der USA zwischen Virginia und New York in der Gezeitenzone von Flьssen vor.

Hemianthus glomeratus ist hingegen in Florida endemisch und auch heute noch an seinen natьrlichen Standorten hдufig. Die Pflanze besiedelt unter anderem nasse Senken und stehende Gewдsser. In der emersen Form auf nassem Boden bildet sie einen dichten, flachen, hellgrьnen Teppich aus winzigen kriechenden Trieben.

Zur Unterscheidung vom echten Hemianthus micranthemoides siehe dort.

Die Blдtter von H. glomeratus sind meistens in Quirlen von 3-4 Blдttern pro Stдngelknoten angeordnet. Sie haben bei submersen Pflanzen eine lanzettliche bis elliptische Form und sind 3-9 mm lang und 2-4 mm breit. Emerse Pflanzen bleiben viel kleiner als submerse, wachsen kriechend und haben elliptische Blдtter. Nur in der Landform entwickeln sich auch die winzigen weiЯlichen Blьten.

Unter dem Namen “Hemianthus micranthemoides” wird auch eine H. glomeratus дhnliche, bisher unbestimmte Hemianthus-Art kultiviert, die sich von H. glomeratus unter anderem durch nur zwei Blдtter pro Stдngelknoten unterscheidet. Zu dieser Pflanze siehe Hemianthus sp. “Amano Pearl Grass”.

(Weiteres siehe unter “Kultur” und “Gestaltung”)

Hemianthus glomeratus

Manatee mudflower

Hemianthus glomeratus

Manatee mudflower

    Delicate fresh green stem plant Small leaves Forms dense bushes

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Description

Hemianthus glomeratus is a delicate stem plant from Florida. In the hobby, it has long been known under the erroneous name H. micranthemoides (or Micranthemum micranthemoides). It was recently identified correctly in the USA. With its small, light green curved leaves it is nice for beautiful dense group plantings. Under intensive light it tends to develop a creeping growth habit and thus can be used as foreground plant for strongly-lit tanks. However, it is better-suited for bushy groups in the middle ground of larger tanks or for the background of nano aquaria. Under strong light it can also be cultivated emerged, given that the substrate is kept moist. Then you’ll get a dense mat with very small leaves.

Baby tears, known as Hemianthus micranthemoides (or Micranthemum micranthemoides) in the hobby for decades, was discovered to be Hemianthus glomeratus by Cavan Allen in early 2011.
True Hemianthus micranthemoides is another species that has probably never been in aquarium cultivation. The last herbarium record of this plant from nature is from the year 1941, and the plant is considered missing and possibly extinct today. Hemianthus micranthemoides used to occur on the Atlantic coast of the USA between the states of Virginia and New York in fluvial tidal zones.

Hemianthus glomeratus, however, is endemic to Flor >(read more)

Baby tears, known as Hemianthus micranthemoides (or Micranthemum micranthemoides) in the hobby for decades, was discovered to be Hemianthus glomeratus by Cavan Allen in early 2011.
True Hemianthus micranthemoides is another species that has probably never been in aquarium cultivation. The last herbarium record of this plant from nature is from the year 1941, and the plant is considered missing and possibly extinct today. Hemianthus micranthemoides used to occur on the Atlantic coast of the USA between the states of Virginia and New York in fluvial tidal zones.

Hemianthus glomeratus, however, is endemic to Florida, where it can still be found in large numbers in its natural habitats. It grows, amongst others, in wet depressions and stagnant waters. Its emersed form, growing on wet soil, forms a dense, low, light green carpet of tiny creeping shoots.
The two Hemianthus species native to North-America can be discerned by means of their flower characteristics:
– H. glomeratus: Flowers are pollinated as soon as they are fully open (chasmogamous), calyx lobes are acute.
– H. micranthemoides: Flowers remain closed and pollinate themselves (cleistogamous), calyx lobes are obtuse.

The leaves of H. glomeratus sometimes are crosswise opposite (2 leaves per stem node), however, most frequently grow in whorls of 3 to 4 leaves per node. The leaves of submersed plants are lanceolate to elliptical, 3 to 9 mm long and 2 to 4 mm wide. Emersed plants remain far smaller than those cultivated submersed, have elliptical leaves and develop a creeping growth habit. Only the land form grows tiny whiteish flowers.

Another Hemianthus species hitherto not closer identified but resembling H. glomeratus is in cultivation under the name “Hemianthus micranthemoides”. It differs from H. glomeratus e.g. by having only two leaves per stem node. For more details, please to go Hemianthus sp. “Amano Pearl Grass”.

H. glomeratus is a relatively undemanding plant that develops best under lots of light (approx. 0,5 watts per litre or more). Then it forms a dense bush with upright, slanted or even horizontal shoots. Under lower light, it grows vertically, forming long internodes. In well-lit aquaria it grows well even without the addition of CO2, however, when CO2 is injected into the tank its growth rate is higher and its habit bushier. If CO2 is deficient, greyish-white lime deposits may form on the leaves (biogenous decalcification). A regular supply of nitrate, phosphate, iron and micronutrients is of advantage, and higher phosphate levels of around 1 to 2 mg/l seem to induce the plant to form larger, more robust stems and to further growth. H. glomeratus is highly susceptible to fish medication containing Erythromycin or Tryptaflavin.

Like all stem plants, Hemianthus glomeratus is propagated by cuttings of stems that are taken out of the bush and re-planted in the substrate. The plant also spreads by growing roots on its creeping stems.

This Hemianthus can be used in many ways. Under intensive light it forms a nice carpet in the foreground, and when it is trimmed frequently it can be formed into a nice bush in the middleground. In small aquaria it can even form a decorative eyecatcher in the background of the tank. Its small leaves make Hemianthus glomeratus an especially interesting plant for nano tanks

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